Which is true about lincoln steffens

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The Shame of the Cities by Lincoln Steffens

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The Untold Truth Of Abraham Lincoln

Spartacus Educational

He was a confidant to presidents, a mentor to two of the most influential journalists in American history, a friend to industrialists, artists, ward heelers, Communists and bohemians. He saw through all pretenses, circumventions and lies — even the ones he told himself — until in the end he was hornswoggled by the biggest lie of all. No idler, he read everything and studied at universities throughout Germany and France. It was the making of him. Hustling desperately, too proud to tell his family he was married, he landed a job as a reporter for The New York Evening Post, where he learned the workings of both Wall Street and the immigrant slums of the Lower East Side, and made friends with a vigorous young police commissioner named Theodore Roosevelt. He was, as usual, in the right place at the right time. Volatile Sam McClure was transforming his namesake publication into a journal that would rip the veil from American life, forcing readers to confront the corruption that had seeped into every seam of their democracy.

Lincoln Joseph Steffens April 6, — August 9, was an American investigative journalist and one of the leading muckrakers of the Progressive Era in the early 20th century. Louis , [1] that would later be published together in a book titled The Shame of the Cities. He is remembered for investigating corruption in municipal government in American cities and leftist values. He was largely raised in Sacramento , the state capital; the Steffens family mansion, a Victorian house on H Street bought from merchant Albert Gallatin in , would become the California Governor's Mansion in He later became an editor of McClure's magazine, where he became part of a celebrated muckraking trio with Ida Tarbell and Ray Stannard Baker.

The correct answer is B. Lincoln Steffens () was a US journalist who was part of the generation of the muckrakers, because he.
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Voters are in a bad mood. And we are all bracing for another anger-pageant that will stomp through American life for the next 13 months until election day. A forgotten moment in our history suggests that the way out of a bad political mood is not more rage, but a new political perspective. It was too easy, the muckraker Lincoln Steffens began to argue, to believe that bad politicians were just immoral people. Instead he asked his massive readership to look at the structure rather than the individual, to think about the warped systems that enabled political corruption, and to consider the ways angry voters inadvertently encouraged behavior they condemned. Steffens was the perfect man for the job.

The family moved to Sacramento. At the University of California he developed radical political views. It has been done; not often, but the fact that a proportion, however small, of college students do get a start in interested, methodical study, proves my thesis My method might lose a boy his degree, but a degree is not worth so much as the capacity and the drive to learn My method was hit on by accident and some instinct. I specialized. With several courses prescribed, I concentrated on the one or two that interested me most, and letting the others go, I worked intensively on my favorites.

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